ABOUT SICKLE CELL DISEASE: VIDEO TRANSCRIPT

NARRATOR:

“To understand sickle cell, let’s start with why cells sickle.”

NARRATOR:

“Healthy red blood cells are round, flexible, and can change shape easily to travel through blood vessels.”

NARRATOR:

“Inside red blood cells is a protein called hemoglobin that carries oxygen throughout the body.”

NARRATOR:

“For people with sickle cell, the body makes a different type of hemoglobin, called sickle hemoglobin.”

NARRATOR:

“After sickle hemoglobin releases oxygen to the body, it can clump together to form long, stiff chains.”

NARRATOR:

“The clumping causes the red blood cells to change shape from round into a sickle, or banana shape. Sickling can then cause other problems in the body.”

NARRATOR:

“Sickle cell is a 365-day-a-year condition. Damage from sickle cell is always happening, even without feeling sick at all.”

NARRATOR:

“Sickling can trigger 3 very serious consequences that may lead to long-term damage.”

NARRATOR:

“First, sickling weakens red blood cells, causing them to break down in 10 to 20 days instead of the normal 90 to 120 days.”

NARRATOR:

“One result of this breakdown is that a substance in the body known as bilirubin goes up, which can cause symptoms, like yellowing of the eyes and skin, called jaundice.”

NARRATOR:

“When red blood cells break down, the body may not have enough healthy red blood cells. This is called anemia and can lead to the body not getting enough oxygen.”

NARRATOR:

“Sickled red blood cells can stick together, blocking blood flow and oxygen delivery to various parts of the body, which can cause harm.”

NARRATOR:

“Understanding sickle cell disease may help you or the person with sickle cell that you care for manage it better.”

NARRATOR:

“Talk to your healthcare provider about all your sickle cell treatment options.”